Learn to Train 6: Give Back

By: Kory Allen

I realize this seminar was almost 4 weeks ago and this review should have been completed not long after the seminar finished… However, my mind has been too boggled from the assault of knowledge and awesome this weekend entailed, therefore prolonging it’s release. Now I think I’ve finally been able to digest what was learned, and the last bit of Chipotle’s has exited my system, allowing me to formalize my thoughts into this summary.

The weekend was composed of a lot of learning and unlearning. It involved tones of growth and an atmosphere hard to replicate in any other gym on the planet. Some serious poundage’s were ripped from the floor, squatted, and pressed to the heavens above.

Live. Learn. Pass on.

…was the core message of the weekend and these jedi (masters of force) were kind enough to take their time to educate myself, other lifters, and coaches on how to train.

 lttApparently you can fit this much brilliance in one room.

For the sake of the EliteFTS motto, it is my responsibility to pass the experience and knowledge I acquired from these brilliant minds on to you. Without further ado, here are the presenters and the biggest nuggets of wisdom I learned from each of them.

Buddy Morris

I’m having a hard time to decide the best nugget of wisdom from this man. The knowledge between his ears isn’t just backed by three decades worth of strength coaching but by years and years of reading and studying the subject. If I had to pick one thing though I’d go with this…

Learn and understand the Hans Seyle GAS principle. GAS or General Adaptation Syndrome is an overview of how the body deals with stress and the phases we go through to deal with perturbations to our internal and external environments. Also, understand everything can be considered stress whether it be eustress (the good stuff) or distress (the bad stuff). It all adds up and it’s critical that you manage it accordingly.

 ltt2

A fundamental chart for life, training and avoiding burnout.

Julia Ladewski

Let your kids play multiple sports, climb trees, pickup rocks, bike, run, swim and whatever other physical activity they want to partake in. Freedom and an assortment of physical activities not only prepares children for long-term physical health but also helps them learn how to problem solve, communicate with others, develop motor coordination and enables them to become more independent; hard to beat that myriad of benefits.

John Meadows

Don’t dig a deep ditch. The further you dig, the further you have to climb up. Training wise, this means utilizing nutrition and recovery methods pre-workout and post-workout which help minimize the damage done during training session. For everything else, this means optimize your shit. Keep the hole as shallow as possible to ensure recovery occurs allowing you can train more often and experience gainz of epic proportion.

Bonus point: fiber is important but sometimes it can make shit(ing) worse.

Fred Duncan

He talked about insulin and no carbs post-workout for fat loss. The blasphemy! I can hear the fanatics now… “If I don’t get my carbs and protein in, I’m going to go catabolic, lose all my muscles and all dem gainz I worked so hard for!”

To be honest, the part about forgoing carbs post-workout isn’t the nugget of wisdom I cared about. The biggest point I took away was this:

He reinforced the fact that there are many ways to skin a cat. There is never one universal method for training and nutrition… Apart from squatting. Squatting solves all.

ltt3

A set of these bad boys will fix you right up, regardless of ailment.

In addition, the idea of questioning the mainstream could also be drawn out of his talk. No carbs post workout?! Yes, it goes against what we’ve been taught. Yes, it might not make sense, and yes, it may not be proven by 500 double-blind, randomized studies but hey! If the method produces results, why not add it to your arsenal of tools in the quest for being shredded.

Gabriel Napinski

Competition is what matters. PR’s in training are cool, but in the grand scheme of things, if they don’t happen at meets or competition then you need to re-evaluate your shit. That’s not to say you’ll need to hit one every meet or win every sporting event, but the goal is to peak when you need to peak. Make it count when it needs to.

ltt4It’s the competition that counts.

Matt Kroc

Mindset. You are what you believe so you best believe you’ll make that squat PR, get that job promotion, and earn what you’re worth. If you believe you aren’t good enough or you’ll fail, you’ve already lost before attempting.

Dave Tate

Another hard person to pick only one point for but for the sake of keeping this short and sweet, Dave’s point about being yourself really hit home. I know it sounds cliché, but the man is right. If you want to start a business or do something amazing, make sure you are passionate about it. Make sure it’s you down to your core and don’t let other people try and sway you from your goals, beliefs and morals.

Bonus Point #2: Find a rock solid training partner or group, preferably one who is stronger or better than you. Training on your own is fine once in a while, but having a support group there in the gym steps up the intensity a thousand fold. You do stuff you’d normally talk yourself out of —  for instance, that squat drop set or those grueling few sets of Bulgarian split squats.

Props to Matt Wenning and the group we trained with on the Sunday after the main event who brought me to this realization. Probably the biggest highlight of the weekend apart from maybe my first Chipotle burrito bowl. That shit was delicious.

ltt5 Omnomnomnomnom!

Summary

Looking back, it was an incredible weekend with more knowledge, positivity, and Chipotles than I could have imagined while on the way to Ohio. Having the chance to train with some of the best in the business and learn from people who practice what they preach and continue to improve in the gym, in life and in business, really lights a fire under my ass to be the best I can be.

Live. Learn. Pass On. was the main theme of the seminar and hopefully by sharing these tidbits of gold that these mentors have passed on to me, I will live up to the EliteFTS mantra by passing them on to you.

——————————————————————–

Which mentor offered the most valuable tip for you? Why? If you have any other questions for Kory about his experience at Learn to Train 6, comment below and remember to “like” us on facebook!

Waterloo Strength ConditioningKory Allen is a 4th year Kin student at the University of Waterloo and an aspiring coach. He has been passionate about the iron game for many years and loves helping people improve their lives, fitness and overall wellbeing. His basic philosophy is to keep it simple and have some fun. Drop him a line on the blog or via email.

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