Coaching the Single Leg Deadlift

Ben Lee, BASc

The single leg deadlift is an effective exercise for the development of the glutes and posterior chain, grip, and lateral core, while also teaching proprioception, stability and force generation off one leg. Unfortunately, this exercise is often overlooked in favour of the bilateral deadlift and squat, and often poorly performed. While squatting and deadlifting on two legs allows you to use much heavier loads, and in turn develop strength and hypertrophy to a greater degree, the single leg variation is a great workout addition to any athlete who needs to be strong and stable in a unilateral stance. Continue reading

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Learn to Train 6: Give Back

By: Kory Allen

I realize this seminar was almost 4 weeks ago and this review should have been completed not long after the seminar finished… However, my mind has been too boggled from the assault of knowledge and awesome this weekend entailed, therefore prolonging it’s release. Now I think I’ve finally been able to digest what was learned, and the last bit of Chipotle’s has exited my system, allowing me to formalize my thoughts into this summary.

The weekend was composed of a lot of learning and unlearning. It involved tones of growth and an atmosphere hard to replicate in any other gym on the planet. Some serious poundage’s were ripped from the floor, squatted, and pressed to the heavens above.

Live. Learn. Pass on.

…was the core message of the weekend and these jedi (masters of force) were kind enough to take their time to educate myself, other lifters, and coaches on how to train.

 lttApparently you can fit this much brilliance in one room.

For the sake of the EliteFTS motto, it is my responsibility to pass the experience and knowledge I acquired from these brilliant minds on to you. Without further ado, here are the presenters and the biggest nuggets of wisdom I learned from each of them.

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MacGyver Conditioning

By: Eric Bowman

The following is a guest post from Eric Bowman; his third so far for the club. To view Eric’s other articles, click here and here. In this article, Eric discusses some unconventional ways to make cardio training fun and effective. As always, enjoy and comment below! – Schuyler

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While I believe strength should be at the forefront of every training program, what good is your strength if you can’t run away from a pissed off Canada Goose without being out of breath, even if you can bench 500 pounds.

A common sight in Waterloo.

Unfortunately, though, when most of people think of cardio, they think of “running” on a treadmill or aimlessly pedalling on a bike for an hour. The only enjoyment in this is getting to watch a couple episodes of Duck Dynasty on the TV attached to your cardio machine of choice.  Conditioning can and should be fun, efficient, and a great way to build a solid physique and work capacity. That being said, commerical gyms make this difficult, considering most don’t even have a Prowler for you to work with. When the weather outside sucks, many people complain about cardio training or worse yet, stop training altogether. So how do you get a decent cardio workout in when you have no useful equipment and the weather outside is lousy? Solution: MacGyver conditioning. In this article, several unique, fun ways to become fit with minimal to no equipment are explored. Continue reading

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8 Things I Wish I’d Known When I Was A High School Athlete

By: Schuyler Schmidt

What a difference a few years of learning makes! My high school “glory days” as a varsity swimmer and runner would have been so much more “glorious” if I had known then what I know now about reaching peak performance.

peo-swimmer-002 Continue reading

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Push Through Discomfort, Not Pain

The following is a guest post by fellow Personal Trainer and volunteer S&C Coach, Brendan Pinto. In this article, Brendan discusses the difference between pain and discomfort, and how to assess the feedback your body provides during exercise. As always, enjoy! – Austin

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By: Brendan Pinto

Randy Zab, my dryland coach when I was an age group swimmer, would put us through grueling core exercises at the end of our dryland sessions. At this point, we would all struggle to hold a plank. Some would just give up and say they couldn’t do it because it hurt too much. In order to get us to do it without giving up he would tell us to “push through discomfort, not pain”.

We don’t only feel pain and discomfort when we are fatigued. Usually athletes or clients will complain of “pain” while doing an exercise with the onset of the slightest uneasiness. There is no doubt that the best step of action to take is to stop the exercise and avoid injury. No one likes being injured, but how do we know if the “pain” we feel is actually pain or just discomfort?

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Maximizing Performance through Carbohydrates

By: Joel Janssen

Carbohydrates are necessary to aid in maintaining blood glucose levels and replenishing muscle glycogen stores. Since muscle glycogen stores are directly related to athletic performance, defined in this post as endurance at high loads and power output, we know maintaining saturated glycogen stores are important. We will analyze from broad to specific ways in which we can allow optimization of muscle glycogen stores, and therefore athletic performance. Continue reading

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University Cooking: The Slow Cooker

By: Kathy Hui

Note: we don’t support one diet/supplement over another, and don’t take responsibility for any of the choices you make.

Living away from home during university is a great time to rebel, party, and lift, but it is also a great time to acquire cooking skills for life! Being able to prepare your own food is essential if you are serious about your nutrition and lifting goals. A key factor in staying on track with your nutrition is to consistently make food for yourself.

When you’re not prepared with enough food to last you the day on campus or waiting for you at home, you’re going to crack and buy food. That’s either going to be expensive for some good-quality noms, or it’s going to be bad for you.

A slow-cooker is exactly what its name implies. It works on the basis of cooking food over a longer period of time at low heat. This way, meat has enough time to get tender. The slow cooker is a highly touted equipment for use in the lifting world. But, is it worth the hype?

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